Maui Harbors Maps

Lahaina • Ma’alaea • Kihei • Makena

The following are custom maps, directions, and photos of each harbor and boat ramp in Maui, Hawaii.

Ma'alea Harbor Map

Enjoy this Maalaea Harbor Map. Below the map, you’ll find directions.

From Lahaina (West Side)
Take the Honoapiilani Hwy all the way south until you get to Maalaea. Make a right into the harbor.

From Wailea (South Side)
Take the Piilani Hwy to North Kihei Road. Take a left on North Kihei Road and follow the coast. Once it starts moving more inland, you’ll turn left at the stoplight on Honoapiilani Hwy. Veer left or turn left into Maalaea Harbor.

PARKING
There’s plenty of free parking near each slip.

Lahaina Harbor Map

Enjoy this Lahaina Harbor Map. Below the map, you’ll find directions.

From Kaanapali (Upper West Side)
Take the Honoapiilani Hwy South until you hit Dickenson St. and Turn Right. Then turn left on Front St. The harbor is on your right side. Turn right into the harbor area.

From Wailea (South Side)
Take the Piilani Hwy to North Kihei Road. Take a left on North Kihei Road and follow the coast. Once it starts moving more inland, you’ll turn left at the stop light on Honoapiilani Hwy. Take this all the way up to Lahaina. You’ll be driving along the Pali (the twisty cliff area along the west coast.) When you reach Lahaina, turn left at Shaw St. Then turn right at the water on Front St. Finally, turn left into the harbor area.

PARKING
Once at the harbor, look for parking on the street (make sure to observe all signs. Time limits and no-parking on certain days and times.) If you can’t find anything here, there are many pay parking lots around the immediate area.

Lahaina Harbor Map

Enjoy this Lahaina Harbor Map. Below the map, you’ll find directions.

From Kaanapali (Upper West Side)
Take the Honoapiilani Hwy South until you hit Dickenson St. and Turn Right. Then turn left on Front St. The harbor is on your right side. Turn right into the harbor area.

From Wailea (South Side)
Take the Piilani Hwy to North Kihei Road. Take a left on North Kihei Road and follow the coast. Once it starts moving more inland, you’ll turn left at the stop light on Honoapiilani Hwy. Take this all the way up to Lahaina. You’ll be driving along the Pali (the twisty cliff area along the west coast.) When you reach Lahaina, turn left at Shaw St. Then turn right at the water on Front St. Finally, turn left into the harbor area.

PARKING
Once at the harbor, look for parking on the street (make sure to observe all signs. Time limits and no-parking on certain days and times.) If you can’t find anything here, there are many pay parking lots around the immediate area.

Kihei Boat Ramp

Enjoy this Makena Beach Entry Map. Below the map, you’ll find directions.

From North (West Side)
If you’re taking the Piilani Hwy, take it to the end, and it will turn right. You’ll eventually turn left at the light at the bottom of the hill. You’re now on Makena Alanui Rd. Follow it until you see signs for the Makena Beach and Golf Resort.

If you’re taking South Kihei Road, follow it until it goes up the hill. Follow it until you see signs to the Makena Beach and Golf Resort.

PARKING
Park at the Makena Beach & Golf Resort and walk down to the activity booth at the beach past the swimming pool.

Maui Sailing Charters

When sailing in Maui, there are many options. Below are some of our favorite Maui Sailing Tour boats.

Kai Kanani

Maalaea Harbor Slip #56
65ft Catamaran (808) 879-7218

Pacific Whale Foundation

Ocean Spirit at Lahaina Harbor Slip #4 luxury catamaran

Maui Classic Charters

Maalaea Harbor Slip #80 & 55
55ft Catamaran (808) 879-8188

Trilogy

Maalaea Harbor Slip #99 & #62, and in Lahaina too!
50 ft Catamaran (808) 874-5649

Fun Sailing Facts

Other than a harbor for boats, port refers to the Left side. “Starboard” means the Right side. We find it easier to remember this by thinking about how port and left both have 4 letters.

A green light refers to the Starboard side.A Schooner is the name of a sailing vessel where the rear (aft) mast is taller than the front (for’ard) mast.

When visiting another country within territorial waters, it is an old custom to fly your own country flag called a “courtesy Flag” above all other flags.

More About Maui

In 1778, Captain James Cook sailed to Maui, but he never set foot on the island. He is credited as being the first non-Islander to see the island. Cook’s expeditions are still a sore subject among native Hawaiian people.

The first European to set foot on the island was the French Admiral Jean Francois de Galaup de La Perouse. He sailed to south Maui, and he landed at what is now called La Perouse Bay on May 29th, 1786.